The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects
 

(Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera)

by Brian Pitkin, Willem Ellis, Colin Plant and Rob Edmunds

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Aulagromyza similis (Brischke, 1880)
[Diptera: Agromyzidae]

Agromyza similis Brischke, 1880. Schr. naturf. Ges. Danzig 5: 258
Phytagromyza centaureana Hering, 1925b. Zeitschrift für Morphologie und Ökologie der Tiere. [A] 4: 522
Agromyza similis Brischke, 1880; Hendel, 1932. Fliegen palaearkt. Reg. 6(2): 291
Paraphytomyza similis (Brischke, 1880); Spencer, 1972b. Handbk ident. Br. Ins. 10(5g): 65
Paraphytomyza similis (Brischke, 1880); Spencer, 1976. Fauna ent. Scand. 5(1): 322-3, figs 582-3.
Paraphytomyza similis (Brischke, 1880); Spencer, 1990. Host specialization in the world Agromyzidae (Diptera) : 243 (fig. 917), 244.
Aulagromyza similis (Brischke, 1880)


Leaf-mine: A long, whitish linear-blotch mine, frequently associated with the mid-rib (Spencer, 1976: 321 (fig. 583), 323).

Unusually long (up to 16 cm), upper-surface, whitish corridor. Often the corridor crosses itself so repeatedly that a secondary blotch develops. Sometimes a few small grains of frass in the initial part of the mine. Otherwise the mine is either completely free from frass, or a few big lumps are deposited at the very end of the corridor. Pupation outside the mine (Bladmineerders van Europa).

The mine is illustrated in the Encyclopedia of Life.

Larva: The larvae of flies are leg-less maggots without a head capsule (see examples). They never have thoracic or abdominal legs. They do not have chewing mouthparts, although they do have a characteristic cephalo-pharyngeal skeleton (see examples), usually visible internally through the body wall. The larvae lie on their sides within the mine and use their pick-like mouthparts to feed on plant tissue.

Posterior spiraclesd with c. 30 bulbs (Bladmineerders van Europa).

Puparium: The puparia of flies are formed within the hardened last larval skin or puparium and as a result sheaths enclosing head appendages, wings and legs are not visible externally (see examples).

Reddish; posterior spiracles on large conical projections, each with up to 24 irregular bulbs extending upwards (Spencer, 1976: 323). The puparium is illustrated in the Encyclopedia of Life.

Hosts in Great Britain & Ireland:

Dipsacaceae        
Knautia       Robbins, 1991: 108
Knautia arvensis Field Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Mines in BMNH
Knautia arvensis Field Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 116
? Succisa pratensis ? Devil's-bit Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Mines in BMNH
? Succisa pratensis ? Devil's-bit Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 116

Host plants elsewhere:

Asteraceae        
Centaurea atropurpurea     Bladmineerders van Europa
Centaurea jacea Brown Knapweed   Bladmineerders van Europa
Centaurea phrygia subsp. pseudophrygia     Bladmineerders van Europa
Centaurea stenolepis     Bladmineerders van Europa
Dipsacaceae        
Knautia       Spencer, 1976: 323
Knautia       Spencer, 1990: 244
Knautia arvensis Field Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Knautia dipsacifolia     Bladmineerders van Europa
Knautia drymeia     Bladmineerders van Europa
Knautia midzorensis     Bladmineerders van Europa
Scabiosa columbaria Small Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Succisa       Spencer, 1990: 244
Succisa pratensis Devil's-bit Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 323
Succisa pratensis Devil's-bit Scabious British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa

Time of year - mines: June-August.

Time of year - adults: Currently unknown.

Distribution in Great Britain & Ireland: Widespread in southern Britain including Surrey (Box Hill and Coulsdon), Gloucester. (Kilcot), Denbighshire (Cefn-y-bedd) (Spencer, 1972b: 65); Warwickshire (Harbury) (Robbins, 1991: 108); North Somerset and Surrey (NBN Atlas).

Also recorded in the Republic of Ireland: Co. Clare (Spencer, 1972b: 65).

Distribution elsewhere: Widespread in much of Europe including Finland, Norway, Sweden, probably Denmark (Spencer, 1976: 322-3), Germany (Spencer, 1976: 566), Austria, Belarus, Czech Republic, French mainland, Hungary, Italian mainland, Lithuania, Poland and Romania (Martinez in Fauna Europaea).

NBN Atlas links to known host species:

Centaurea jacea, Knautia arvensis, Scabiosa columbaria, Succisa pratensis

British and Irish Parasitoids in Britain and elsewhere: Currently unknown.



External links: Search the internet:
Biodiversity Heritage Library
Bladmineerders van Europa
British leafminers
Encyclopedia of Life
Fauna Europaea
NBN Atlas
NHM UK Checklist
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