The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects
 

(Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera)

by Brian Pitkin, Willem Ellis, Colin Plant and Rob Edmunds

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Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880
[Diptera: Agromyzidae]


Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880. Schr. naturf. Ges. Danzig (N.F.) 5(1-2): 238
Phytomyza pseudohellebori Hendel, 1920. Arch. Naturgesch. 84A(7) (1918): 152
Phytomyza mimica Hering, 1928. Zoologische Jahrbücher, Abteilung für Systematik, Ökologie und Geographie der Tiere 55: 573
Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880; Hendel, 1935. Fliegen palaearkt. Reg. 6(2): 152
Phytomyza bonsdorfi Hendel, 1936. Dt. ent. Z. (N.F.) 9(1-2): 500. [Nomen nudum ]
Phytomyza ranunculiphaga Lundquist, 1949. Opusc. ent. 14: 173. [Synonymised by Spencer, 1976: 414]
Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880; Spencer, 1972b. Handbk ident. Br. Ins. 10(5g): 73, 79, 87, 118
Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880 ; Spencer, 1976. Fauna ent. Scand. 5(1): 414-5, fig. 724
Phytomyza fallaciosa Brischke, 1880; Spencer, 1990. Host specialization in the World Agromyzidae (Diptera) : 21, 27, 43, 45 (figs 166-7), 178.


Leaf-mine: Larva forms a linear mine, normally at the apex of leaf, winding backwards and forwards and thus forming a secondary blotch which quickly turns brown. Pupation internal (Spencer, 1976: 415).

A compact secondary blotch, without islands of unmined green tissue. Mines usually dirty brown in colour, strikingly resembling a dead and rotting leaf segment. Both primary and secondary feeding lines apparent. Frass partly in long strings. Pupation takes place within the leaf, in a lower-surface pupariuml chamber, often somewhat removed from the mine itself (Bladmineerders van Europa).

The mine is also illustrated in British leafminers.

Larva: The larvae of flies are leg-less maggots without a head capsule (see examples). They never have thoracic or abdominal legs. They do not have chewing mouthparts, although they do have a characteristic cephalo-pharyngeal skeleton (see examples), usually visible internally through the body wall.

The larva is illustrated in Bladmineerders van Europa.

Puparium: The puparia of flies are formed within the hardened last larval skin or puparium and as a result sheaths enclosing head appendages, wings and legs are not visible externally (see examples).

The puparium is illustrated in Bladmineerders van Europa. Varies in colour from white to brown (Spencer, 1976: 415).

Hosts in Great Britain & Ireland:

Ranunculaceae        
Ranunculus       Robbins, 1983: 25
Ranunculus       Spencer, 1972b: 73
Ranunculus acris Meadow Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 118
Ranunculus bulbosus Bulbous Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Robbins, 1989: 24
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Mines in BMNH
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Robbins, 1991: 27
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 119

Hosts elsewhere:

Ranunculaceae        
Ranunculus       Spencer, 1976: 415
Ranunculus       Spencer, 1990: 21
Ranunculus acris    

Bladmineerders van Europa, as Ranunculus acer

Ranunculus auricomus Goldilocks Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Ranunculus breyninus     Bladmineerders van Europa
Ranunculus lanuginosus     Bladmineerders van Europa
Ranunculus lingua Greater Spearwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 415
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 415
Ranunculus repens Creeping Buttercup British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa

Time of year - mines: June, November.

Time of year - adults: Currently unknown.

Distribution in Great Britain & Ireland: Widespread in Britain including Denbighshire (Cefn-y-bedd), Dunbartonshire (Spencer, 1972b: 73), Warwickshire (Allesley and Coventry) (Robbins, 1991: 27); Cambridgeshire, East Cornwall, Monmouthshire, Pembrokeshire, South Somerset and South-west Yorkshire (NBN Atlas).

Also recorded in the Republic of Ireland: Co. Clare (Spencer, 1972b: 73).

Distribution elsewhere: Widespread and common in much of Europe including Iceland, Faroe Is., Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden (Spencer, 1976: 415), The Netherlands, Germany (Bladmineerders van Europa), Czech Republic, Estonia, Iceland, Italian mainland, Lithuania and Poland (Martinez in Fauna Europaea).

NBN Atlas links to known host species:

Ranunculus acris, Ranunculus bulbosus, Ranunculus lingua, Ranunculus repens

British and Irish Parasitoids in Britain and elsewhere:

Chalcidoidea   
Miscogaster maculata Walker, 1833 Pteromalidae: Miscogastrinae
Ichneumonoidea  
Chorebus fallaciosae Griffiths, 1967 Braconidae: Alysiinae
Heterolexis balteata (Thomson, 1895) Braconidae: Alysiinae
Eurytenes abnormis (Wesmael, 1835) Braconidae: Opiinae
Opius pallipes Wesmael, 1835 Braconidae: Opiinae


External links: Search the internet:
Biodiversity Heritage Library
Bladmineerders van Europa
British leafminers
Encyclopedia of Life
Fauna Europaea
NBN Atlas
NHM UK Checklist
Find using Google
Find using Google Scholar
Find images using Google


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Last updated 06-Dec-2017 Brian Pitkin Top of page