The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects
 

(Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera)

by Brian Pitkin, Willem Ellis, Colin Plant and Rob Edmunds

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Trypeta artemisiae (Fabricius, 1794)
[Diptera: Tephritidae]


Musca artemisiae Fabricius, 1794. Entom. syst. 4: 351
Musca perelegans Harris, [1782]. JOURNAL: PAGE. [Synonymised by Stephens, 1829]
Trypeta artemisiae (Fabricius, 1794); White, 1988: 63. Handbk ident. Br. Ins. 10(5a): 24, 40, 63.


Leaf-mine: The mine begins as an elongated blotch overlying a strong vein; from there broad tunnels radiate that coalesce in the end. All frass is concentrated at a central point in the floor of the mine. As a result the mine has a brownish-black centre and a paler brownish green seam. The larva often (perhaps always at daylight) rests in the centre of the mine. Primary and secondary feeding lines as a rule quite clear. Pupation outside the mine (Bladmineerders van Europa).

An elongated blotch centred over a vein. There are two types: greenish with a blackish centre and entirely reddish-black (British leafminers).

Larva: The larvae of flies are leg-less maggots without a head capsule (see examples). They never have thoracic or abdominal legs. They do not have chewing mouthparts, although they do have a characteristic cephalo-pharyngeal skeleton (see examples), usually visible internally through the body wall.

The larva is illustrated in Bladmineerders van Europa and British leafminers.

Puparium: The puparia of flies are formed within the hardened last larval skin or puparium and as a result sheaths enclosing head appendages, wings and legs are not visible externally (see examples).

Yellow; anterior spiracle openings arranged in large arcs, not elevated on a fan-shaped structure; posterior spiracles each with a central opening larger and more raised than the lateral openings (White, 1988: 63). The puparium is illustrated in Bladmineerders van Europa.

Trypeta artemisiae puparia
Trypeta artemisiae pupariria
Image: © Willem Ellis (Bladmineerders van Europa)

Comments: Uffen in Chandler (1978) did not indicate whether his host records were British of Foreign and therefore the associations are included under 'Host in Britain' and 'Hosts elsewhere'.

Hosts in Great Britain & Ireland:

Asteraceae        
Achillea ptarmica Sneezewort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Artemisia       White, 1988: 63

? Artemisia

      Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Artemisia absinthium Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. British leafminers
Artemisia absinthium Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Robbins, 1991: 119
Artemisia verlotiorum Chinese Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Mines in BMNH
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. British leafminers
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Mines in BMNH
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Robbins, 1991: 118
Chrysanthemum       Robbins, 1991: 116
Chrysanthemum       White, 1988: 63
? Eupatorium       Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Eupatorium cannabinum Hemp-agrimony British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Senecio       White, 1988: 63
? Senecio       Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. British leafminers
? Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Robbins, 1991: 117
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63

Hosts elsewhere:

Asteraceae        
Achillea       Hering, 1957
Achillea biserrata     Bladmineerders van Europa
Achillea gnaphalioides     Bladmineerders van Europa
Achillea moxa     Bladmineerders van Europa
Achillea ptarmica Sneezewort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa

? Artemisia

      Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Artemisia       Hering, 1957
? Artemisia absinthium Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Artemisia absinthium Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
? Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Chrysanthemum indicum     Bladmineerders van Europa
? Eupatorium       Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Leucanthemum       Hering, 1957
? Leucanthemum vulgare Oxeye Daisy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
? Senecio       Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Senecio       Hering, 1957
Senecio nemorensis Wood Ragwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
? Senecio vulgaris Groundsel British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Tanacetum corymbosum     Bladmineerders van Europa
Tanacetum macrophyllum Rayed Tansy   Bladmineerders van Europa
? Tanacetum parthenium Feverfew British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63
Tanacetum parthenium Feverfew British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
? Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Uffen in Chandler, 1978: 222
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
? Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. White, 1988: 63

Time of year - mines: September-October.

Time of year - adults: ? June.

Distribution in Great Britain & Ireland: Throughout Britain, more common in the north than in the south (White, 1988: 63) including Warwickshire (Packington) (Robbins, 1991: 119); Dorset (VC9), County Durham (VC66), Glamorganshire (VC41), Hertfordshire (VC20), Mid-west Yorkshire (VC64), North Hampshire (VC12), North Wiltshire (VC7), North-west Yorkshire (VC65), Shropshire (VC40), South Hampshire (VC11), South-east Yorkshire (VC61), Staffordshire (VC39), Surrey (VC17), Warwickshire and Westmorland (NBN Atlas).

Distribution elsewhere: Throughout the Palaearctic Region, except the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern areas (White, 1988: 63), including The Netherlands, Luxembourg (Bladmineerders van Europa) and Belgium (Leclercq and de Bruyn, 1991). See also Pape & Beuk . See also Fauna Europaea.

NBN Atlas links to known host species:

Achillea ptarmica, Achillea millefolium, Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia verlotiorum, Artemisia vulgaris, Eupatorium cannabinum, Leucanthemum vulgare, ? Senecio vulgaris, Tanacetum macrophyllum, ? Tanacetum parthenium, Tanacetum vulgare

British and Irish Parasitoids in Britain and elsewhere:

Chalcidoidea   
Chrysocharis illustris Graham, 1963 Eulophidae: Entedoninae
Diglyphus chabrias (Walker, 1838) Eulophidae: Eulophinae
Diglyphus isaea (Walker, 1838) Eulophidae: Eulophinae
Pnigalio pectinicornis (Linnaeus, 1758) Eulophidae: Eulophinae
Sphaeripalpus fuscipes (Walker, 1833) Pteromalidae: Miscogastrinae
Ichneumonoidea  
Utetes truncatus (Wesmael, 1838) Braconidae: Opiinae


External links: Search the internet:
Biodiversity Heritage Library
Bladmineerders van Europa
British leafminers
Encyclopedia of Life
Fauna Europaea
NBN Atlas
NHM UK Checklist
Find using Google
Find using Google Scholar
Find images using Google


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