The leaf and stem mines of British flies and other insects
 

(Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera)

by Brian Pitkin, Willem Ellis, Colin Plant and Rob Edmunds

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Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848)
[Diptera: Agromyzidae]


Agromyza curvipalpis Zetterstedt, 1848. Dipt. Scand. 7: 2782
Agromyza proboscidea Strobl, 1900b. Wiss. Mitt. Bosn. Herceg. 7: 91. [Synonymised by Spencer, 1964: 786]
Agromyza prominens Becker, 1908a. Mitt. zool. Mus. Berlin. 4: 170. [Synonymised by Spencer, 1964: 786]
Ophiomyia achillea Hering, 1937c. Blattminen Mittel- und NordEuropas Lief 5, 6: 562. [Synonymised by Spencer, 1964: 786]
Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848); Spencer, 1964a. Beitr. Ent. 14: 786
Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848); Spencer, 1972b. Handbk ident. Br. Ins. 10(5g): 23 (figs 46-7), 27, 111, 114, 117
Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848); Spencer, 1976. Fauna ent. Scand. 5(1): 64, figs 67-9
Ophiomyia curvipalpis (Zetterstedt, 1848); Spencer, 1990. Host specialization in the World Agromyzidae (Diptera) : 133, 251, 253, 259, 261, 274, 299, 301.


Leaf-mine: A narrow, inconspicuous stem mine. Pupation at the end of the mine (Spencer, 1976: 64).

Fine, upper- or lower-surface corridor, ending in a thick vein. From there the mine extends finally to the rind of the stem. There also the pupation takes place, usually not far from the root collar. Mines in the stem rind often are conspicuous through a red discoloration (Bladmineerders van Europa).

Larva: The larvae of flies are leg-less maggots without a head capsule (see examples). They never have thoracic or abdominal legs. They do not have chewing mouthparts, although they do have a characteristic cephalo-pharyngeal skeleton (see examples), usually visible internally through the body wall.

The larva is described by de Meijere (1937a).

Puparium: The puparia of flies are formed within the hardened last larval skin or puparium and as a result sheaths enclosing head appendages, wings and legs are not visible externally (see examples).

Yellowish or completely black; anterior spiracles projecting through epidermis; posterior spiracles each with 3 bulbs (Spencer, 1976: 64).

Hosts in Great Britain & Ireland:

Asteraceae        
Achillea       Robbins, 1991: 115
Achillea millefolium Yarrow British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 111
? Anthemis       Spencer, 1972b: 111
? Matricaria       Spencer, 1972b: 114
Fabaceae        
? Medicago sativa Lucerne British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1972b: 117

Hosts elsewhere:

Asteraceae        
Achillea       Spencer, 1990: 301
Achillea millefolium Yarrow British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Achillea millefolium Yarrow British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 64
Achillea ptarmica Sneezewort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Achillea ptarmica Sneezewort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 64
Anthemis       Spencer, 1990: 301
Anthemis tinctoria Yellow Chamomile British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Anthemis tinctoria Yellow Chamomile British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 64
Artemisia       Spencer, 1990: 301
Artemisia absinthium Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Artemisia campestris Field Wormwood British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Artemisia vulgaris Mugwort British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976: 64
Aster       Bladmineerders van Europa
Aster       Spencer, 1990: 274
Centaurea       Spencer, 1990: 251
Centaurea jacea Brown Knapweed   Bladmineerders van Europa
Centaurea pratensis     Bladmineerders van Europa
Centaurea rhenana Panicled Knapweed   Bladmineerders van Europa
Clinopodium vulgare Wild Basil British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Crepis       Spencer, 1990: 259
Hieracium laevigatum Tongue-leaved Hawkweed   Bladmineerders van Europa
Hieracium vulgatum Common Hawkweed British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Matricaria       Spencer, 1990: 301
Matricaria inodora     Bladmineerders van Europa
Matricaria odorata     Spencer, 1976: 64
Reichardia       Spencer, 1990: 259
Reichardia       Bladmineerders van Europa
Solidago virgaurea Goldenrod British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Tripleurospermum perforata Scentless false mayweed British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Bladmineerders van Europa
Fabaceae        
Medicago sativa Lucerne British Wild Flowers by John Somerville et al. Spencer, 1976:
Lamiaceae        
Satureja       Bladmineerders van Europa
Stachys glutinosa     Bladmineerders van Europa

Time of year - mines: June-September (Hering, 1957).

Time of year - adults: Currently unknown.

Distribution in Great Britain & Ireland: Widespread in south, not uncommon. Surrey (Box Hill and Epsom), Dorset (Portland), Cambridgeshire (Burwell) and Suffolk (Woodditton) (Spencer, 1972b: 27); Cambridgeshire, Glamorgan, Monmouthshire and Nottinghamshire (NBN Atlas).

Distribution elsewhere: Widespread in continental Europe from Spain to the [former] U.S.S.R., including Denmark, Sweden (Spencer, 1976), Belgium (de Bruyn and von Tschirnhaus, 1991), Austria, Canary Is., Czech Republic, Estonia, European Turkey, Germany, Hungary, Italian mainland, Lithuania, Poland, Switzerland and Yugoslavia (Martinez in Fauna Europaea).

NBN Atlas links to known host species:

Achillea millefolium, Achillea ptarmica, Anthemis tinctoria, Artemisia absinthium, Artemisia campestris, Artemisia vulgaris, Centaurea jacea, Centaurea rhenana, Clinopodium vulgare, Hieracium laevigatum, Hieracium vulgatum, Medicago sativa, Solidago virgaurea, Tanacetum vulgare, Tripleurospermum inodora

British and Irish Parasitoids in Britain and elsewhere: Currently unknown.



External links: Search the internet:
Biodiversity Heritage Library
Bladmineerders van Europa
British leafminers
Encyclopedia of Life
Fauna Europaea
NBN Atlas
NHM UK Checklist
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